A Blast From The Past: Vintage Photos From The 1960s

From Woodstock and the bombshells of Hollywood to the Vietnam War and the Civil Rights Movement, the 1960s were filled with historical events and people. Although not everyone knew it at the time, the decade marked a time of growth in not only the United States but the world.

Take a seat and get ready to scroll through some important, memorable, and momentous moments in the 1960s that were forever frozen in time.

Batman Became Live-Action

Batman Became Live-Action
FilmPublicityArchive/United Archives via Getty Images
FilmPublicityArchive/United Archives via Getty Images

The 1960s brought to the small screen something extraordinary, a live-action comic book adaptation of Batman. Starring Adam West as Bruce Wayne-Batman and Burt Ward as Dick Grayson/Robin, the series was very popular.

Known for its campy style, simplistic morality, and upbeat music and fight scenes, it was the only situation comedy on television at the time to not rely on a laugh track, a huge feat considering people were still interested in watching the superhero show.

Robyn Hilton Went From Small Town Girl To “Blonde Bombshell”

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Scarlettgm27/Pinterest
Scarlettgm27/Pinterest

Born in the small town of Twin Falls, Idaho, Robyn Hilton went from being the town’s weathergirl to pursuing bigger and better things. Before appearing as a guest on The Tonight Show, Starring Johnny Carson, Hilton starred alongside Mel Gibson in Blazing Saddles, and she even posed for Playboy.

Ironically, it’s not the magazine or films that captivated people. Many believe her looks are behind the phrase “blonde bombshell,” a term that started after her time on Johnny Carson.

Girls Cruisin’ Around In A Simca 1000 Coupe

Girls Cruisin' Around In A Cimca 1000 Coupe
Touring Club Italiano/Marka/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Touring Club Italiano/Marka/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

The 1000 Simca coupe was mass-produced between 1962 and 1971. The rear-engined two-door coupe was then upgraded in 1967, with the radiator being moved from the back of the car to the front, allowing for better weight distribution even though the engine remained in the back of the car.

The style was wildly admired by the young folk due to its “race car” look and feel. These two girls are obviously enjoying the car!

Peter Fonda On The Set Of Easy Rider

Peter Fonda On The Set Of Easy Rider
FilmPublicityArchive/United Archives via Getty Images
FilmPublicityArchive/United Archives via Getty Images

In 1969, a “touchstone for a generation” was released, Easy Rider. Starring Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper, the road drama is known as one of the greatest in American cinema, exploring social landscapes, tensions, and issues in the US during the 60s.

When broken down, the film is probably one of the more realistic exposes on life in America during the social shifts of the ’60s. It was ahead of its time!

The Crowd At Woodstock

Three Days Of Crowded Love At Woodstock
FilmPublicityArchive/United Archives via Getty Images
FilmPublicityArchive/United Archives via Getty Images

From August 15 -18, 1969, young people across the United States flocked to Bethel, New York, for what is now known as one, if not the, most pivotal moments in music history.

Three days of peace, love, and music, the festival had musical talents such as Jimi Hendrix, The Grateful Dead, and Santana performing on stage. With more than 400,000 people gathered on a dairy farm, the festival has become known as one of the biggest cultural movements of the generation.

Pippi Longstocking Went To The Silver Screen

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FilmPublicityArchive/United Archives via Getty Images
FilmPublicityArchive/United Archives via Getty Images

Based on the Astrid Lindgren children’s novels of the same name, the character of Pippi Longstocking made her way to the silver screen in 1969. A super-strong kid with bright red pigtails, Pippi was the character of a generation.

Starring Inger Nilsson in the title role on Pippi Longstocking, audiences watch as she and her friends, a monkey called Mr. Nilsson and her horse Little Old Man, turn her new town upside down.

Chantal Goya Taking A Break From Singing

Chantal Goya Taking A Break From Singing
PICOT/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images
PICOT/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

Here, French singer, Chantal Goya is seen taking some time for herself away from the studio. But when she wasn’t riding a bike around town, Goya could be seen recording her unique hybrid style of mid-’60s girl-group pop and French chanson.

Along with her singing career, Goya was also a French New Wave actress, starring on the silver screen in films such as Masculin, féminin, and L’amour c’est gai, l’amour c’est triste.

Birgitta Lindman Helping A Showgirl Get Ready For The Stage

Birgitta Lindman Helping A Showgirl Get Ready For The Stage
Harry Todd/Fox Photos/Getty Images
Harry Todd/Fox Photos/Getty Images

In 1959, Swedish SAS airline stewardess Birgitta Lindman was brought in to inspect a showgirl’s uniform before going on stage. This was after news broke that stewardesses’ would be getting shorter skirts as part of their uniforms.

The costume was vastly different than the everyday apparel typically worn by airline stewardesses’ in the 1950s. Looking at Lindman’s face in this photograph, it’s safe to assume she was not overly sure about the change in their uniform.

Eddy Michell Goofing Around With The Chaussettes Noires

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PICOT/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images
PICOT/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

Starting his singing career off as one of the members of the French group the Chaussettes Noires, Eddy Michell found almost instant success. While their debut album sold over two million copies, Michell still opted to go solo in 1963.

As it turned out, the move was stellar for his career, paving the way for multiple record deals and even some film opportunities. Here, he’s seen goofing off with some of his old bandmates.

Brigitte Bardot Playing At The Beach

Brigitte Bardot Playing At The Beach
broadclystWI/Twitter
broadclystWI/Twitter

During the 1950s and 1960s, Brigitte Bardot was one of the biggest faces on the silver screen. Born in 1934 and aspiring to be a ballerina, Bardot instead found herself acting and landing roles throughout her adolescence, including the Italian melodrama Concert of Intrigue.

Before “retiring elegantly” from acting in 1973, Bardot starred in one last film, the French comedy The Edifying and Joyous Story of Colinot, where she plays the role of Arabelle.

Raquel Welch On The Dick Cavett Show

Raquel Welch On The Dick Cavett Show
ABC
ABC

Comedy writer and author Dick Cavett hosted the late-night talk show The Dick Cavett Show from 1968 and 1995. During his time, Cavett interviewed numerous celebrities, including actress Raquel Welch.

This particular discussion became famous for more than Welch’s iconic blue dress. During her time on the show, Welch discussed her upcoming project, a gender-change comedy. The topic was controversial, at best, with another guest saying she didn’t understand the premise of the movie.

Miss Florida Waterskiing

Miss Florida Waterskiing
Marka/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Marka/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

In 1962, Gloria Brody was crowned Miss Florida, the young lady who would represent the southern state at the Miss United States pageant. At the age of 19, Brody didn’t win the Miss United States pageant, but she did perform a memorable ballet for her talent, an interpretive Ballet, Theme from Exodus.

Here, the Jacksonville, Florida, native is seen enjoying a day on the water, skiing while smiling for the boat-riding paparazzi.

The Monkees Taking A Breather

The Monkees Taking A Breather
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

Originally formed in 1965 as part of a situation comedy series called The Monkees, the rock band of the same name swiftly gained popularity throughout the decade. Made up of David Jones, Mickey Dolenz, Peter Tork, and Michael Nesmith, The Monkees would go on to tour and make music long after the show was canceled.

While they certainly weren’t The Beatles, The Monkees were considered to be one of the most popular groups of the 1960s.

David R. Scott Going Under Astronaut Training

David R. Scott Going Under Astronaut Training
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

On his first mission to space in 1966, David R. Scott piloted the Gemini VIII, alongside Neil Armstrong. He would have been the second person to step on the moon had it not been for an emergency that made the crew abort the mission.

Scott now holds the title of the seventh person who has ever stepped foot on the moon. Here, Scott is seen in a special tank that’s used to conduct water egress training.

The Crowd At Chicago’s Wrigley Field

A Packed Wrigley Field
Kirn Vintage Stock/Corbis via Getty Images
Kirn Vintage Stock/Corbis via Getty Images

Built in 1914 and named Weeghman Park, the infamous ballpark soon found a new owner in William Wrigley Jr. As such, the stadium was renamed Wrigley Feild in 1927 and has stayed that way ever since.

Home to the Chicago Cubs baseball franchise, the stadium is known for its sporadic wind patterns that come off Lake Michigan, its ivy-covered brick outfield wall, the hand-turned scoreboard, and the iconic red marquee located at the entrance to the park.

Alfred Hitchcock And Janet Leigh On The Set Of Psycho

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George Rinhart/Corbis via Getty Images
George Rinhart/Corbis via Getty Images

Right at the start of the 1960s, Alfred Hitchcock released one of his famed thriller films, Psycho. Starring Janet Leigh and Anthony Perkins, Psycho has been remade numerous times and is wildly considered to be Hitchcock’s best film.

Here, Hitchcock and star Janet Leigh are seen laughing in a candid photograph taken on the set of the film. In 1992, the Library of Congress selected Psycho for the National Film Registry.

The British Invasion

The British Invasion
Cummings Archives/Redferns
Cummings Archives/Redferns

No one was ready for the mid-’60s British Invasion. The cultural phenomenon brought rock and pop talents from across the pond and showcased the idea of counterculture like never before.

Groups such as the Dave Clark Five, The Rolling Stones, and The Who were finding their footing on American soil during this time. Of course, one of the main bands leading the forefront of the “invasion” was a little four-man band called the Beatles.

“Duck And Cover” Drills Were School Norms

GraphicaArtis/Getty Images
GraphicaArtis/Getty Images

People who grew up in the 1960s probably feel an odd sense of nostalgia seeing these school children underneath their desks during a duck and cover drill. Unfortunately, the aftermath of World War II left people in a panic, thinking a nuclear attack was going to happen any minute.

One way to “prepare” for such an attack was to have duck and cover drills during school hours. Thankfully, the drills never had to be put into action.

Beatlemania

Beatlemania
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

The first publicity the Beatles garnered in the United States was in October of 1963. From there, people looked forward to reading, watching, or learning about the group. So much so that the television networks broadcasting stories on the band were soon dubbed the events “Beatlemania.”

It didn’t take long for people to line up for tickets at the box office or for fans to scream their heads off during their shows.

Linda Ronstadt Was One Of The Most Popular Artists

Linda Ronstadt's Was One Of The '60 Most Popular Artists
Ed Caraeff/Getty Images
Ed Caraeff/Getty Images

Starting her career as the lead singer for the Stone Poneys, Lisa Ronstadt soon made a name for herself in the 1960s music scene in California. Soon after, she went solo, recording Hand Sown…Home Grown, an album that’s described as being the first alternative record made by a female artist.

Fame eluded her at the start, but she soon became known as the first female “arena class” rocker, becoming one of the highest-grossing concert artists of the decade.

Surfin’ On A Party Wave

Surfin' On A Party Wave
Alan Band/Keystone Features/Getty Images
Alan Band/Keystone Features/Getty Images

Circa 1960s, a group of teenagers surf on a party wave in Florida. And while the sport isn’t nearly as popular as it is in today’s culture, people could still be found on their boards in the early hours of the day, catching waves with their friends.

Thankfully, music from popular brands such as The Beach Boys helped legitimize the laid-back surfer lifestyle, so people no longer saw them as “hippie beach bums.”

Jimi Hendrix Pretending To Hitchhike At The Airport

Jimi Hendrix Pretending To Hitchhike At The Airport
Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images
Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images

Described as “arguably the greatest instrumentalist in the history of rock music” by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Jimi Hendrix made quite a splash in the 1960s music scene. After returning home from his time in the US Army, Hendrix picked up a guitar and never turned back.

After the release of his first and only number one album Electric Ladyland, Hendrix picked to headline the festival of the century, Woodstock.

A Secretary With No Computer Or Phone In Sight

A Secretary With No Computer Or Phone In Sight
Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images
Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

With all of the technology available now, it’s hard to imagine a time when going to work meant good old fashion paper pushing. In the 1960s, that meant no computer to organize spreadsheets or do email and no cellphone to play around on during lunch.

This man, for example, is sitting at his desk with nothing more than pamphlets, a pen, and a whole lot of paper that is vastly unorganized.

Muhammad Ali Training

Muhammad Ali Training
Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images
Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images

Nicknamed “the greatest,” Muhammad Ali is known as one of the greatest boxers of all time and one of the most celebrated figures of the 20th century. Starting as an amateur boxer at the age of 12, Ali went on to participate in 61 fights throughout his professional career, only losing five.

He remains the only three-time lineal champion in the heavyweight division and the only fighters to be named The Ring magazine Fighter of the Year a total of six times.

Future Halloween Star

Jamie Lee Curtis
Martin Mills/Getty Images
Martin Mills/Getty Images

This 1966 photograph might look like a movie still of a young Jamie Lee Curtis, but no one really saw the future actress on-screen until the ’70s, when she played Laurie Strode in the horror film Halloween.

From there, she established herself as a high-profile scream queen, landing roles in films such as The Fog, Terror Train, Prom Night, and all of the Halloween sequels and remakes, including the most recent 2018 direct sequel Halloween.

“The Golden Age Of The Stewardess”

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Throughout the 1960s, one of the “dream jobs” for young women was an airline stewardess. With the clean-cut uniforms, friendly smiles, and youthful appearances, the decade has become known as “The Golden Age of the Stewardess.”

Of course, it was during a time when a majority of fliers were wealthy older men. Nowadays, flying is much more accessible, and flight attendants have gone from being dolled-up young ladies to being normal, everyday people.

“Stop! In The Name Of Love”

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Donaldson Collection/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
Donaldson Collection/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

If there is one song that screams Supremes, it’s “Stop! In the Name of Love.” From March 27, 1965, through April 3, 1965, the song held the number one spot on the Billboard pop singles chart.

The popular song was nominated for the 1966 Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Rock & Roll Group Vocal Performance, losing out to “Flowers on the Wall” by the Statler Brothers. Even so, the song has stood the test of time, with most people knowing the iconic “stop” hand motion.

Audrey Hepburn Bringing Class To Breakfast At Tiffany’s

Audrey Hepburn Bringing Class To Breakfast At Tiffany's
Mondadori via Getty Images
Mondadori via Getty Images

In 1961, actress Audrey Hepburn brought a whole new meaning to the phrase L.B.D, aka the little black dress. Her iconic performance as high-society gal Holly Golightly is not only considered one of Hepburn’s most identifiable roles but Break at Tiffany’s was also her most challenging.

According to Hepburn, playing the role of Holly wasn’t easy for her, as the character is an extrovert and the actress is, ironically, an introvert. She obviously does the part justice, as she was nominated for an Academy Award for her performance.

W.O. Bentley Standing With His Two Cars

Bentley Standing With His Two Cars
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images
National Motor Museum/Heritage Images/Getty Images

Born in 1888, Walter Owen Bentley and his brother, Horace, went on to co-found one of the leading luxury automobile companies in the world, Bentley Motors Limited. It wasn’t until 1919 when the company name became patented, good timing with Bentley setting racing records left and right throughout the ’20s.

Here, an older W.O. Bentley is seen standing between two vintage Bentleys on his property in London, circa the 1960s. In 1995, Bentley was inducted into the Automotive Hall of Fame.

Gilligan’s Island Tina Louise

Portrait Of Tina Louise
Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images
Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images

Actress Tina Louise is probably best known for her role as Ginger Grant in the popular comedy series Gilligan’s Island. Even though the series brought a lot of fame Louise’s way, she was afraid the 1960s show was going to have her typecast for the rest of her career.

To everyone on the outside, that didn’t seem like the case, as Louise continued to work in Hollywood after the cancelation of the series. Even so, Louise believes Gilligan ruined her career.

The Beach Boys Posing On A California Beach

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Formed in 1961, the Beach Boys found their footing as one of the first self-contained rock groups. Starting as a garage band, people soon found themselves dancing along to the group’s early surf music.

By 1963, the Beach Boys had a string of top-ten hits, each showcasing Southern California youth culture with romance, cars, and, of course, surfing. Their funky blend of jazz, rock and roll, and R&B was dubbed the “California sound.”

The Famous Whiskey A Go Go

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

First constructed in Chicago in 1958, the famous Whiskey a Go Go on the Sunset Strip in West Hollywood, California, wasn’t founded until a few years later, in 1964. The latter venue is now known as the place where huge names in music first got their start.

Bands such as The Doors, No Doubt, Van Halen, and Guns ‘N’ Roses, have all played on the famed stage. With its huge mark on the music industry, the venue was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2006.

Kirk Douglas Mailing In His Academy Award Ballot While In Costume

Kirk Douglas Mailing Letter in Spartacus Costume
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

Appearing in over 90 films throughout his long career, Kirk Douglas was known as one of the leading stars of Hollywood’s Golden Age. During his career, Douglas starred in box-office hits such as Spartacus, Lonely are the Brave, and The Bad and the Beautiful.

Here, Douglas is seen mailing in his Academy Award ballot wearing none other than his Spartacus costume from the 1960 film of the same name. That year, the film won four Academy Awards.

John Wayne And His Daughter On The Set Of The Alamo

John Wayne and Daughter Aissa on Movie Set
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

Actor John Wayne is known for his western flicks, with a career spanning from the silent era of film, into the Golden Age of Hollywood, and eventually into the American New Wave. Throughout his long career, Wayne appeared in 179 films and television shows.

Some of his higher-profile films included True Grit, of which he won an Academy Award, and The Quiet Man. Here, he is with his daughter on the set of the film The Alamo.

Elizabeth Taylor As The Title Character In Cleopatra

Elizabeth Taylor As The Title Character In Cleopatra
Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Actress Elizabeth Taylor was one of the leading ladies of 1960s Hollywood. Here, she is seen on the set of the period drama Cleopatra, a film where she met her fifth husband, Richard Burton.

While the public didn’t exactly approve of the relationship, no one could fault their chemistry on screen. The two actors went on to star in 11 films together, including the 1966 movie Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?. Taylor won an Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance.

Kids Lining Up For The School Bus

Kids Lining Up For The School Bus
L. Willinger/FPG/Hulton Archive/Getty Images
L. Willinger/FPG/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Nothing quite captures 1960s schooling like young kids lined up waiting to board the school bus. Here, the kids are dressed in cute school-appropriate skirts, blouses, slacks, and shirts while carrying lunch boxes, a stark difference from the students of today.

While many kids still ride the bus today, it’s not as commonplace as it used to be, and seeing all of the kids dressed in their school clothes with their tin lunch boxes brings back all of the memories.

Family Board Game Night

Family Board Game Night
Harold M. Lambert/Getty Images
Harold M. Lambert/Getty Images

One aspect of the 1960s that people take for granted nowadays is family game night. Here, a father is playing the board game “sorry” with his three children (and a doll) while his wife looks on with a smile on her face.

This scene, along with the smiles on everyone’s faces, is the epitome of a ’60s family living in America. All that’s missing is a dinner table with a pot roast!

Apollo 11 Launch Center

Apollo 11 Launch Center
Mario De Biasi/Mondadori via Getty Images
Mario De Biasi/Mondadori via Getty Images

On July 20, 1969, Apollo 11 became the first spacecraft to land on the moon, and Neil Armstrong became the first person to step foot on the lunar surface. Armstrong, along with co-pilot Buzz Aldrin, spent two hours and 45 minutes on the moon, collecting 47.5 pounds worth of materials to bring back to Earth for examination.

This particular picture shows the launch center of the famous Apollo 11 spacecraft.

Ali MacGraw Posing For Glamour

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Saul Leiter/Condé Nast via Getty Images
Saul Leiter/Condé Nast via Getty Images

Beginning her career in 1960, Ali McGraw worked her way up from being a photographer’s assistant at Harper’s Bazaar to being a fashion model for Vogue. From there, it didn’t take much for McGraw to land commercials and television appearances.

But her claim to fame comes from the 1969 film Goodbye, Columbus. For her performance, the new actress won the Golden Globe for Most Promising Newcomer. The award committee was on to something because McGraw was nominated for an Oscar the very next year.

Tony Curtis In Costume For Taras Bulba

Tony Curtis In Costume For Taras Bulba
Ernst Haas/Ernst Haas/Getty Images
Ernst Haas/Ernst Haas/Getty Images

Tony Curtis’ acting career spans over six decades, with the peak of his popularity being in the 50s and 60s. Known for being a versatile actor, Curtis starred in everything, from comedies to long-winded drama epics.

Here, Curtis is seen on the set of the period drama Taras Bulba. After a series of comedies, westerns, and even a few biopics, in 1962, Curtis dove right into this drama, a genre that he hadn’t performed in for quite some time.

Oliver! Won Best Picture In 1968

Oliver! Won Best Picture In 1968
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

In 1968, the stage performance Oliver! was brought to the silver screen in a musical drama of the same name. Directed by Carol Reed, the film made a splash at the 41st Academy Award ceremony.

The film was nominated for an astounding 11 nominations, taking home the golden trophy for Best Picture, Best Director, and an honorary award for Best Choreography. Here, actor Mark Lester can be seen as Oliver, who’s about to say, “Please, sir, can I have some more?”

The 1961 Washington Square Park Ban On Folk Music

A crowd protests ban on folk music in Washington Square Park in 1961
Dick Kraus/Newsday RM via Getty Images
Dick Kraus/Newsday RM via Getty Images

While the 1960s were a huge time for Freedom of Speech, one little slice of the United States wasn’t having any of it– Washington Square Park in Greenwich Village, New York. In March of 1961, Park Commissioner Newbold Morris put a band on the folk genre, not allowing artists to play it in the park.

Soon after, on April 9, 1961, huge crowds swarmed the square, protesting the ban on folk music.

The Rolling Stones Posing In The Country

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Michael Ward/Getty Images
Michael Ward/Getty Images

Formed in 1962, the Rolling Stones was one of the most popular hard rock bands throughout the ’60s and ’70s. With a grittier sound than conventional rock music, the Rolling Stones pioneered the heavier sound that has come to define hard rock music.

Here, the young men making up the Rolling Stones at the time are seen posing in the countryside. From left to right, it’s Brian Jones, Bill Wyman, Keith Richards, Mick Jagger, and Charlie Watts.

Marilyn Monroe Getting A Wardrobe Fix

Marilyn Monroe Getting A Wardrobe Fix
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

Through the ’50s and ’60s, Marilyn Monroe became the symbol of feminine beauty, changing the ways people looked at sexuality during the time. As a model and actress, Monroe became one of the top-billed talents of the decade, with her films grossing two billion dollars by the time of her death (as of the 2017 currency exchange).

The American Film Institute has billed Monroe as one of the greatest female screen legends from the Golden Age of Hollywood.

Coach Sammy Baugh Getting Titans Practice Ready

Coach Sammy Baugh Getting Titans Practice Ready
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

Sammy Baugh was a former football player for Washington, helping bring the Championship home to the state in both 1937 and 1942. After his time with the team, Baugh hung up his pads and traded in his uniform for a whistle, becoming a coach for the New York Titans from 1960-1961 and then the Houston Oilers in 1964.

Here, Coach Baugh is seen blowing his whistle, getting the Titans ready to practice at the Polo Grounds in New York.

Nobel Prize-Winning Writer William Faulkner On Horseback With Grover Vandevender

Nobel Prize-Winning Writer William Faulkner On Horsback With Grover Vandevender
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

William Faulkner is probably one of the most celebrated writers in American literature, having written novels, short essays, poetry, short stories, and even a play. Best known for his novels, Faulkner went on to win a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for his novel A Fable as well as the last novel of his career, The Reivers.

Ironically, both of those works are considered to be “minor novels” in the grand scheme of Faulkner’s catalog!

Behind-The-Scenes Of Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid

Behind-The-Scenes Of Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid
Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images
Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images

One of the big movies to come out of the 1960s was George Roy Hill’s Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. Starring Paul Newman, Robert Redford, Katharine Ross, the film is a story of friendship, love, and a whole lot of criminal behavior.

Based on a remarkable true story, the 1969 film was wildly praised upon its release, with critics calling it “one of the defining moments in late-’60s American cinema.”

Picketing Outside The White House

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Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

The decade of the 1960s was a strange time. Not only was the United States still warring with Vietnam, but the entire country went further on pins and needles when the Cuban Missile Crisis occurred in October of 1962.

Leaving the country in suspense for one month and four days, the scare did nothing but make people extremely paranoid. Here, people are picketing outside of the White House, peacefully asking the president not to invade Cuba and start another war.

Judy Garland During A Performance At Carnegie Hall

Judy Garland During A Performance At Carnegie Hall
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

Actress and singer Judy Garland had a successful career spanning 45 years. Known for being very versatile, Garland climbed her way to international stardom with her roles in The Wizard of Oz, A Star is Born, and Judgment at Nuremberg.

Throughout her career, Garland was the proud recipient of a Golden Globe Award, an Academy Juvenile Award, and a Special Tony Award. She’s also the first female to win a Grammy for Album of the Year.

Yogi Berra During Game Three Of The 1964 World Series

Yogi Berra Watching During Game Three Of The 1964 World Series
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

Yogi Berra was a New York Yankee through and through. Starting and ending his professional career with the team, Berra hung up his catcher’s mitt and helmet at the end of the 1963 season. Afterward, he hopped on as the team’s manager.

In this particular photo, Berra is seen watching on as the Yankees play the St. Louis Cardinals during game three of the World Series. Unfortunately, the Yankees lost that year.

Two Legends, One Picture

Two Legends, One Picture
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

If there were only two superstars to come out of the 1960s, they’re arguably Barbara Streisand and Audrey Hepburn. While they never performed on the same project, each actress made their own splash in entertainment.

Streisand is one of the few to have won an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony Award, while Hepburn is known for her multiple performances as well as her contributions to the fashion world — little black dress, anyone?

MLK Hugging His Wife

MLK Hugging His Wife
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

One of the most recognized faces during the 1960s was none other than minister Martin Luther King Jr. As one of the leading forces behind the Civil Rights Movement, MLK swiftly became a name known for his nonviolent protests and his 1963 “I Have a Dream Speech.”

Here, he is seen hugging his wife, Coretta, after learning that he’s been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Luther King was awarded the prestigious prize on October 14, 1964.

Strolling Around The 1965 World’s Fair In New York

Strolling Around The 1965 World's Fair In New York
Walter Leporati/Getty Images
Walter Leporati/Getty Images

In 1964 and 1965, Queens, New York, held The World’s Fair, an exhibit that invited 10 restaurants, over 140 pavilions, over 45 corporations, 24 states, and 80 nations to build attractions for the public.

The entire exhibition was “Man’s Achievement on a Shrinking Globe in an Expanding Universe,” and more than 51 million people ventured to the Flushing Meadows-Corona Park fairgrounds to see inventions of the future. Even little kids didn’t miss the event, as seen by this picture!

The King’s Wedding

The King's Wedding
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

After returning home from his service in the United States Army, Elvis Presley, aka The King, had his most successful run in the music industry. Throughout the ’60s, The King released some of his biggest hits, including “Can’t Help Falling in Love” and “Return to Sender.”

His film career also took off after the war, with Presley starring in multiple works such as Flaming Star and Welcome in the Country. He also married Priscilla in 1967.

Twiggy: “The Face Of 1966”

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Ron Galella Collection via Getty Images
Ron Galella Collection via Getty Images

Dame Lesley Lawson, aka Twiggy, is considered “the face of 1966.” Known for her very thin build, Twiggy was seen as having an androgynous appearance, with both male and female qualities.

Her big eyes and long lashes with her short hair intrigued high-end fashion designers, helping her climb the industry’s ladder. By the tie 1967 rolled around, Twiggy had modeled in most of the major countries, including France, the United States, and Japan.

Natalie Wood Taking A Break From Acting

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Ron Galella Collection via Getty Images
Ron Galella Collection via Getty Images

Starting out in the entertainment industry at the young age of four, Natalie Wood proved she was more than a child actor when the ’60s rolled around. Playing major roles such as Marie in West Side Story proved Wood was a serious actress, ready to take on more mature roles.

She jumps full force into those roles in the 1961 film Splendor in the Grass and the 1963 movie Loe with the Proper Stranger. For both performances, she received Academy Award nominations.

John Lennon And Yoko Ono Taking Some Time For Themselves

John Lennon And Yoko Ono Smelling The Flowers
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

Musician John Lennon and his former wife Yoko Ono met on November 9, 1966, at Ono’s art exhibit. Ironically, Ono didn’t know Lennon was famous of that he was part of one of the biggest bands in the world, the Beatles.

After a suspect start to their relationship, the two were married in 1968 and were together on and off until 1980, when Lennon was assassinated outside of his New York residence.

Dustin Hoffman Helping A Puppy Get Water

dustin hoffman
Ron Galella Collection via Getty Images
Ron Galella Collection via Getty Images

Before The Graduate was released in 1967, actor Dustin Hoffman was an unknown. Then, after the release, he was suddenly high-profile, with various directors and studios wanting to get their hands on the young actor.

It helps that his first performance also resulted in his first Academy Award nomination! As of 2020, Hoffman is the proud recipient of not one but two Academy Awards. His first for his performance in Kramer vs. Kramer and the second for his role in Rain Man.

Katharine Ross Was At Peak Popularity In The ’60s

Katharine Ross Was At Peak Popularity In The '60s
Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images
Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images

The 1960s was a very good decade for Katharine Ross. Not only did her acting career get off the ground, but she was awarded a few prestigious nominations, including an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance as Elaine Robinson in The Graduate.

Ross garnered further acclaim when she landed the role of Etta Place in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, a performance that earned her a BAFTA Award for Best Actress.

Joan Collins And Warren Beatty

Joan Collins And Warren Beatty
Bettmann/Getty Images
Bettmann/Getty Images

Two huge names to come out of the 1960s entertainment industry are Joan Collins and Warren Beatty. Both were in multiple films throughout the decade (Beatty more so than Collins). Collins’ more memorable projects included Hard Time for Princes and Subterfuge, both of which she plays the leading lady.

On the other hand, Beatty had a bit more exposure, landing lead roles in big-name projects such as Bonnie and Clyde, The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone, and Promise Her Anything.